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Powwow Press Archives

 

June 2017, King’s Living Magazine:  “The first thing you hear is the beating of the drums.  Some believe the beating of Native drums represents the heartbeat of Mother Earth.  Others get caught up in the primitive sound that seems to penetrate your soul.  Next you become aware of the high-pitched singing that follows the rhythm of the drum beats.  You close your eyes and for a moment you are transported back hundreds of years to a time when the ancestors of these drummers played the same drum beats and sang the same songs in their lodges and villages.”

                    

 

June 2017, King’s Living Magazine:  “You quickly realize the moving colors are part of the different regalia worn by the representatives of the many Native tribes that make up the local Native Community.  You take in the scene – Native dancers in colorful regalia dancing together in the style and to the music that their ancestors danced to for hundreds of years.”

 

                    

June 13, 2017, Powwow Volunteer:  “Wow you really put the "WOW" in Powwow!!!! That was amazing! 

 

Just wanted to let you know I really enjoyed myself last Saturday from the beginning to the end. The whole day filled my senses, the drumming, the jingles, the singing, the regalia, the smiling faces, the smells of food and blessings, the kind words.”

            

                        

June 2017, King’s Living Magazine:  “You experienced your first powwow – an event that mirrors the traditional way Native Americans have interacted socially and celebrated important events for generations.  You had no idea these people existed or were part of the Colorado Springs community.  You have a new found appreciation for another culture and their traditions.”

 

The Gazette, July 16, 2016: Tribes band together at Colorado Springs powwow, demonstrating unity

The pulse of the drums could be felt by everyone in the room. The drummers were chanting to the beat. The Native American dancers, adorned in elaborate clothing featuring beautiful bead patterns and feathers, performed the traditional dances of their ancestors.

 

July 18, 2015, 7th Annual Colorado Springs Native American Powwow sponsored by the Palmer Lake Historical Society and One Nation Walking Together

 

July 17, 2015, The Gazette:  “Drumming taps something rousing in the human spirit, and for Native Americans, that power can represent a direct connection with the natural world – the drums are considered the heartbeat of Mother Earth.”  

 

“Now in its seventh year and drawing crowds of about 3,000, the festival is a celebration of Native American history and culture. . .”

 

July 19, 2015, The Gazette:  “The heartbeat of the drums could be felt throughout the room Saturday as dozens danced to the beat to share ancient traditions with their young children and hundreds of strangers.”  “There is a strong kinship . . . and it’s not just about the dance:  it’s almost like a healing when you go in there and feel the drum."

 

Annual Native American festival, powwow held in Colorado Springs

By Angela Case

Published: July 20, 2015 Fox 21 News

 

Colorado Springs Powwow gives 'heartbeat' to Native American culture

By Kassondra Cloos July 19, 2015

The Gazette

 

Intertribal Festival and Powwow celebrates Native American history, culture in Colorado Springs

By: Stephanie Earls  July 16, 2015

The Gazette

 

July 19, 2014, 6th Annual Colorado Springs Native American Powwow sponsored by the Palmer Lake Historical Society and One Nation Walking Together

 

July 2, 2014, The Tribune:  “Powwows are a chance for the Native American community to meet up with old friends and make new ones.  It is also an opportunity to pass their culture down to a younger generation so that they may learn about their heritage.”

 

July 16, 2014, The Gazette:  “Maybe you can picture a powwow: a collision of color, song, dance, and tradition that to non-Natives is often as beautiful as it is strange.  For them, a powwow is a chance to see a legacy of hundreds of years played out . . . but the powwow is essentially for Native Americans. . .”   

 

 

July 20, 2013, 5th Annual Colorado Springs Native American Powwow sponsored by the Palmer Lake Historical Society and One Nation Walking Together

 

July 20, 2013, The Gazette – Go Section:  “It’s a joyful, colorful and educational celebration of the American Indian culture.”

 

July 20, 2013, The Gazette:  “Powwows bring people together.  So we’re hoping that the community comes back together – the ones who have gone their own way, the ones whose organizations have dropped out from under them . . .”   “A lot of folks don’t really understand Native American tradition and culture . . . one of the things that we try to do at our powwow is have the Master of Ceremonies explain to the non-Native audience what is happening.”

 

July 24, 2013, The Tribune: The Native American Intertribal Festival and Traditional Powwow sponsored by the Palmer Lake Historical Society and One Nation Walking Together “brought out a large crowd . . . many Native Americans from different tribes participated in the powwow.”  Over 2,000 people attended.